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Trovati 4 documenti.

The elements of law, natural and politic
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Hobbes, Thomas, (1588-1679.)

The elements of law, natural and politic : part I, Human nature, part II, De corpore politico ; with Three lives / Thomas Hobbes ; edited with an introduction and notes by J.C.A. Gaskin.

Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.

Abstract: 'the state of men without civil society (which state we may properly call the state of nature) is nothing else but a mere war of all against all.' Thomas Hobbes was the first great philosopher to write in English. His account of the human condition, first developed in The Elements of Law (1640), which comprises Human Nature and De Corpore Politico, is a direct product of the intellectural and political strife of the seventeenth century. It is also a remarkably penetrating look at human nature, and a permanently relevant analysis of the fears of self-seeking that result in the war of 'each against every man'. In The Elements of Law Hobbes memorably sets out both the main lines of his general philosophy, later augmented in De Corpore (1655), and the moral and political philosophy later made famous in Leviathan (1651). Copies of Human Nature and De Corpore Politico, until 1889 printed as separate works, are rare antiques or scarcely less rare scholarly texts; this is the first complete popular edition. It is here supplemented by chapters from De Corpore and Three Lives, two from Hobbes's original Latin. These have never before been published together in English.

India : the Emerging Giant
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Libri Moderni

Panagariya, Arvind

India : the emerging giant / Arvind Panagariya.

Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2008.

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Abstract: India is not only the world's largest and fiercely independent democracy, but also an emerging economic giant. But to date there has been no comprehensive account of India's remarkable growth or the role policy has played in fueling this expansion. India: The Emerging Giant fills this gap, shedding light on one of the most successful experiments in economic development in modern history. Why did the early promise of the Indian economy not materialize and what led to its eventual turnaround? What policy initiatives have been undertaken in the last twenty years and how do they relate to the upward shift in the growth rate? What must be done to push the growth rate to double-digit levels? To answer these crucial questions, Arvind Panagariya offers a brilliant analysis of India's economy over the last fifty years--from the promising start in the 1950s, to the near debacle of the 1970s (when India came to be regarded as a "basket case"), to the phenomenal about face of the last two decades. The author illuminates the ways that government policies have promoted economic growth (or, in the case of Indira Gandhi's policies, economic stagnation), and offers insightful discussions of such key topics as poverty and inequality, tax reform, telecommunications (perhaps the single most important success story), agriculture and transportation, and the government's role in health, education, and sanitation. The dramatic change in the fortunes of 1.1 billion people has, not surprisingly, generated tremendous interest in the economy of India. Arvind Panagariya offers the first major account of how this has come about and what more India must do to sustain its rapid growth and alleviate poverty. It will be must reading for everyone interested in modern India, foreign affairs, or the world economy.

Leviathan
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Hobbes, Thomas, (1588-1679.)

Leviathan / Thomas Hobbes ; edited by Marshall Missner.

New York : Pearson Longman, c2008.

The Longman library of primary sources in philosophy

The French Revolution and the creation of Benthamism
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Libri Moderni

Blamires, Cyprian.

The French Revolution and the creation of Benthamism / Cyprian Blamires.

New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.

Abstract: The first study of how Genevan Etienne Dumont, and his traumatic experience of the French Revolution, shaped the reception and presentation of 'Benthamism' and masked the true face of Jeremy Bentham, one of the architects of modern society who visualised a new world based on the values of transparency, accountability, and economy.