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The elements of law, natural and politic
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Hobbes, Thomas, (1588-1679.)

The elements of law, natural and politic : part I, Human nature, part II, De corpore politico ; with Three lives / Thomas Hobbes ; edited with an introduction and notes by J.C.A. Gaskin.

Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.

Abstract: 'the state of men without civil society (which state we may properly call the state of nature) is nothing else but a mere war of all against all.' Thomas Hobbes was the first great philosopher to write in English. His account of the human condition, first developed in The Elements of Law (1640), which comprises Human Nature and De Corpore Politico, is a direct product of the intellectural and political strife of the seventeenth century. It is also a remarkably penetrating look at human nature, and a permanently relevant analysis of the fears of self-seeking that result in the war of 'each against every man'. In The Elements of Law Hobbes memorably sets out both the main lines of his general philosophy, later augmented in De Corpore (1655), and the moral and political philosophy later made famous in Leviathan (1651). Copies of Human Nature and De Corpore Politico, until 1889 printed as separate works, are rare antiques or scarcely less rare scholarly texts; this is the first complete popular edition. It is here supplemented by chapters from De Corpore and Three Lives, two from Hobbes's original Latin. These have never before been published together in English.

Hegel's Philosophy of right. Translated with notes by T. M. Knox.
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Libri Moderni

Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich, (1770-1831.)

Hegel's Philosophy of right. Translated with notes by T. M. Knox.

London, New York, Oxford University Press [1967]

Abstract: Among the most influential parts of the philosophy of G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831) were his ethics, his theory of the state, and his philosophy of history. The Philosophy of Right (Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts) (1821), the last work published in Hegel's lifetime, is a combined system of moral and political philosophy, or a sociology dominated by the idea of the state. Here Hegel repudiates his earlier assessment of the French Revolution as a "a marvelous sunrise" in the realization of liberty. Rejecting the republican form of government, he espouses an idealized form of a constitutional monarchy, whose ultimate power rests with the sovereign.

John Locke
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Libri Moderni

Locke, John, (1632-1704.)

John Locke : essays on the law of nature : the Latin text with a translation, introduction, and notes ; together with transcripts of Locke's shorthand in his journal for 1676 / edited by W. von Leyden.

Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press ; Oxford : Clarendon Press, 2002.

Abstract: This is the standard edition of John Locke's classic work of the early 1660s, Essays on the Law of Nature. Also included are selected shorter philosophical writings from the same decade. In his 1664 valedictory speech as Censor of Moral Philosophy at Christ Church, Oxford, Locke discusses the question: Can anyone by nature be happy in this life? The volume is completed by selections from Locke's manuscript journals, unpublished elsewhere: on translating Nicole's Essais de Morale; on spelling; on extension; on idolatry; on pleasure and pain; and on faith and reason. The great Locke scholar W. von Leyden introduces each of these works, setting them in their historical context. This volume is an invaluable source for Locke's early thought, of interest to philosophers, political theorists, jurists, theologians, and historians.

Natural right and history.
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Strauss, Leo.

Natural right and history.

Chicago, University of Chicago Press [1953]

Charles R. Walgreen Foundation lectures

Abstract: In this classic work, Leo Strauss examines the problem of natural right and argues that there is a firm foundation in reality for the distinction between right and wrong in ethics and politics. On the centenary of Strauss's birth, and the fiftieth anniversary of the Walgreen Lectures which spawned the work, Natural Right and History remains as controversial and essential as ever. "Strauss ...makes a significant contribution towards an understanding of the intellectual crisis in which we find ourselves ...[and] brings to his task an admirable scholarship and a brilliant, incisive mind."--John H. Hallowell, American Political Science Review Leo Strauss (1899-1973) was the Robert Maynard Hutchins Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in Political Science at the University of Chicago.

On the duty of man and citizen according to natural law
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Pufendorf, Samuel, Freiherr von, (1632-1694.)

On the duty of man and citizen according to natural law / Samuel Pufendorf ; edited by James Tully ; translated by Michael Silverthorne.

Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991.

Cambridge texts in the history of political thought

Abstract: On the Duty of Man and Citizen (1673) is Pufendorf's succinct and condensed presentation of the natural law political theory he developed in his monumental classic On the Law of Nature and Nations (1672). His theory was the most influential natural law philosophy of the seventeenth- and eighteenth-centuries. He advanced a compelling reply to Grotius and Hobbes, and in doing so, set the intellectual problems for theorists such as Locke, Hutcheson, Hume, Rousseau, and Smith. In the aftermath of the Thirty Years' War, Pufendorf sets forth a classic justification of the early modern enlightened state and of the proper relations of moral and political subjection to it. This lucid and historically sensitive translation by Michael Silverthorne, (a classicist and a specialist in Roman Law and early modern political thought) is the first since the early twentieth century. James Tully's introduction sets the text in its seventeenth-century context, summarises the main arguments, surveys recent literature on Pufendorf, and shows how Pufendorf transformed natural law theory into an independent discipline of juristic political philosophy which dominated reflection on politics until Kant.

De cive, or, The citizen
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Hobbes, Thomas, (1588-1679.)

De cive, or, The citizen / by Thomas Hobbes ; edited with an introduction by Sterling P. Lamprecht.

Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1982.

Natural human rights
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Libri Moderni

Boylan, Michael <1952->

Natural human rights : a theory / Michael Boylan, Marymount University, Virginia.

Law, ethics and the biopolitical
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Libri Moderni

Swiffen, Amy.

Law, ethics and the biopolitical / Amy Swiffen.

New York, N.Y. : Routledge, 2011.

Abstract: Law, Ethics and the Biopolitical explores the idea that legal authority is no longer related to national sovereignty, but to the 'moral' attempt to nurture life. The book argues that whilst the relationship between law and ethics has long been a central concern in legal studies, it is now the relationship between law and life that is becoming crucial. The waning legitimacy of conventional conceptions of sovereignty is signalled the renewal of a version of natural law, evident in discourses of human rights, that de-emphasises the role of a divine law-giver in favour of an Aristotelian conception of the natural purpose of life and the 'common good'. Synthesising elements of legal scholarship on sovereignty, theories of biopolitics and biopower, as well as recent developments in the domains of ethics, Amy Swiffen examines the invocation of 'life' as a foundation for legal authority. The book documents the connection between law, life and contemporary forms of biopolitical power by critically analysing the fundamental principles of the bioethical paradigm. Unique in its critical and cross-disciplinary approach, Law, Ethics and the Biopolitical will be of interest to students and teachers in the areas of law and society, law and literature, critical legal studies, social theory, bioethics, psychoanalysis, and biopolitics.