Cicero, Marcus Tullius.

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Trovati 2 documenti.

De re publica
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Libri Moderni

Cicero, Marcus Tullius.

De re publica : selections / Cicero ; edited by James E.G. Zetzel.

New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Cambridge Greek and Latin classics

Abstract: Cicero's De re publica contains the fullest ancient account of the theory of the mixed constitution and the oldest extant narrative of early Roman history; it concludes with the Dream of Scipio, one of the most influential ancient visions of the afterlife. The argument of the dialogue concerns the relationship between political theory and practice, and between social institutions and the individual citizen. This edition of most of the surviving portions of De re publica is the most detailed commentary ever to appear in English. It explains Cicero's philosophical argument and its relationship to his account of early Rome, and thoroughly elucidates the language and style of the treatise. The introduction offers a new and provocative interpretation of Cicero's dialogue as a work both of literature and of political philosophy.

On fate
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Libri Moderni

Cicero, Marcus Tullius.

On fate = De Fato / Cicero. The Consolation of philosophy = Philosophiae Consolationis IV.5-7, V / edited, with an introduction, translations and commentaries by R.W. Sharples.

Warminster, England : Aris & Phillips, c1991.

Abstract: Cicero and Boethius did more than anyone else to transmit the insights of Greek philosophy to the Latin culture of Western Europe which has played so influential a part in our civilisation to this day. Cicero's treatise On Fate, though surviving only in a fragmentary and mutilated state, records contributions to the discussion of a central philosophical issue, that of free will and determinism, which are comparable in importance to those of twentieth-century philosophers and indeed sometimes anticipate them. Study of the treatise has been hindered by the lack of a combined Latin text and English translation based on a clear understanding of the arguments; Dr Sharples' text is intended to meet this need. The last book of Boethius' Consolation is linked with Cicero's treatise by its theme, the relation of divine foreknowledge to human freedom.